#losehatenotweight

 

A few weeks ago, the Huz and I had the honor of visiting Virgie Tovar as she did an informal run through of this TedTalk. I’m SO EXCITED to share this talk with you!

There is a lot here that resonates with me. Coming from a family that places a high value on beauty, being fat always meant that I would not fully participate in certain family celebrations (e.g. wedding parties) or that any teasing directed my way was somehow seen as okay because I deserved the scrutiny. A lifetime of paralyzing comments can often lead you to believe (as Virgie points out) that life begins later. If I could do life over again, I would wish that someone gave me the following advice a lot sooner:

You shouldn’t wait one more day, one more pound. The next time that you look in the mirror and you have the impulse to judge the body you see, or you look at another person and you have the impulse to judge their body, remember that childlike sense of wonder. After all, you have nothing to lose but your shame.

– Virgie Tovar

It wasn’t until well into adulthood that I learned that waiting for later is absolutely useless. Kudos, Virgie! Many thanks for your words.

Maraming Salamat,
Joanne L. Rondilla, Ph.D.
Fremont, CA

Same Family, Different Colors

Tharps

I still have to pick up my copy of Same Family, Different Colors: Confronting Colorism in America’s Diverse Families by Lori L. Tharps. Years ago, she interviewed me for this project and I was so ecstatic when it came out late last year. Confession: That interview is what inspired me to start this blog. So thank you, Lori!

Yes, I’m slow to get my copy. But I did want you all to know about this fabulous and important book. For those of you who have read it, I’d love to know what you think!

Maraming Salamat,
Joanne L. Rondilla, Ph.D.
Tempe, AZ

Red & Yellow, Black & Brown

RYBB

Hello Everyone!

I greatly apologize for my negligence with respect to this website. A LOT has happened in 2017 and when I finally have the chance to catch my breath, I’ll update you and let you know all about the craziness of my life, and how that will impact the future of this blog. (It’s good news, I promise!) For now, I want to let you know that my newest book project has just been released! I am very fortunate to have worked with Rudy P. Guevarra and Paul Spickard on Red & Yellow, Black & Brown: Decentering Whiteness in Mixed Race Studies. You can purchase it directly from Rutgers University Press here.  (Pssst. For 30% off, please use discount code: 02AAAA16. Shhh. You didn’t hear that from me.)

Maraming Salamat,
Joanne L. Rondilla, Ph.D.
Tempe, AZ

unfair and lovely

Unfair-and-Lovely

Photo series, “Unfair and Lovely” was created by Pax Jones.

When your work is on colorism and skin color hierarchy, it’s always a treat when you find gems like this – especially when it comes from the people in your world. Recently, several people sent and/or tagged me in this (and other related stories) story on Facebook. What started as a photo series evolved into a hashtag campaign, #unfairandlovely. I highly recommend that you check out your social media outlets and contribute (respectfully) to the conversation.

While most of the current photos under #unfairandlovely feature South Asian women, I do hope to see people from other racial and ethnic backgrounds represent what it is to be #unfairandlovely. In particular, I am curious to see how #unfairandlovely is represented in the LGBTQ community. Though social media has its limits, I also see its potential to inspire conversation (which will hopefully lead to action) about these issues.

Kudos to you, Pax Jones, for creating art that makes a difference!

Maramang Salamat,

Joanne L. Rondilla, Ph.D.

Tempe, AZ

a hapa bachelorette

caila

Note: Photo found here.

Many thanks to Akemi Johnson for chatting with me for her NPR story, What Would It Mean to Have a Hapa Bachelorette. It’s always a pleasure to speak to writers about current events, especially as it relates to my own research. As an academic, feeling like you’re an imposter, or that your research is irrelevant, is a daily insecurity. However, talking to other people who inspire and push you to connect your research to the ideas they’re working on really helps solidify your own work. For that, I am grateful. Hope you enjoy the story!

Maraming salamat!

Joanne L. Rondilla, Ph.D.

Mesa, AZ

Light and Shadows

uganda

Many thanks to my dear friend Margaret for sharing this article with me. (The image is from the article.) Sadly, skin bleaching/skin lightening/skin whitening is something that is common all over the world (yes, even Asia). Photographer Anne Ackermann has a series that looks at women and skin bleaching in Uganda. The article points out that there is an idealized type of dark skin – one that is caramel colored. It is this idealized shade that these women aspire to have when they get bleaching treatments. This logic is a new twist on an old idea: that lighter is better. The words are just different now. Instead of expressing desired whiteness, many people (mostly women) express a desired lightness. In my research, I illustrate that many point to this distinction to avoid accusations of racism and self-hatred.  Though the words are different, at the heart of it all, it means the same thing. Wanting to be a lighter shade of you is the new (yet still old) colorism.

Maraming salamat,

Joanne L. Rondilla, Ph.D.

Mesa, AZ